“Look, we’re not doing this for the money……”

I met with Dr. Kazan today, the neurosurgeon who will accompany Dr. Wiet on my Superior Canal Dehiscence repair, and the title of this post is exactly what he said to me. He continued, “we’ve been doing this for a long time. We don’t need the money. We do this out of pride. Out of giving people a positive result and continuing to get better and better.”

I found that reassuring, which is what I’m sure he meant for me to feel. And I must say, these two surgeons have given me much more time and attention than I think I would have received at a University hospital, where it seems there are far more patients and a premium on seeing as many as they can each day. We visited a prominent university hospital (not Northwestern) in Chicago, and I felt like the doctor there could have spent a little more time with us.

Dr. Kazan mentioned today, in response to one of my concerns, that they monitor the facial nerve closely during surgery by inserting needles attached to equipment into my face. The primary facial nerve runs right through the area in which they will be working.  If facial nerves are triggered during the procedure, they will know immediately and adjust their approach. Facial nerve damage is a potential, albeit uncommon outcome for SCD repair. The other significant neurological risk is a cerebrospinal fluid leak, which is why there is always a neurosurgeon present for the procedure. I found it interesting to hear a neurosurgeon, in a specialty that most people default to as the top of the surgical pecking order, speak of taking a backseat in the OR. These two are old partners, veterans of thousands of surgeries together, and Dr. Kazan spoke very highly of Dr. Wiet, suggesting that in the OR “this will be his show.”

They’ll be using pieces of my own skull to help form the seal over the dehiscence and damaged tegmen. It will be taken from the underside of the bone flap removed during the craniotomy — as I understand it, anyway. Dr. Kazan said to expect two and half to three hours for the surgery,  depending on how much repair the tegmen requires.

The Hinsdale Hospital where I will be having my operation was outfitted for these types of surgeries at the suggestion of my two doctors, who, when the hospital was built, told them “we will lose patients to Mayo and Northwestern if you do not make this investment.” Evidently, they did, and both doctors have told me that there is not a better-suited OR in the country for my procedure.

So, I’m in good hands by all accounts, and I’m also receiving a second opinion (hopefully soon) from another one of the best SCD surgeons in the country. I’m fortunate to have these resources and opportunities, and I know that. And yet, my hang up is still with the unknown. The “what if?” My greatest fear is that I emerge worse than I am now. I fear loss of function as opposed to the restoration of it, and again, that comes from the fact that I really don’t feel all that bad right now; certainly not as bad as I once was.

Below are pre-op and post-op testimonials from a patient of Dr. Wiet’s. I watch these a lot:

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