Decision Making with SCDS?

So, I’m supposed to make this huge decision that will, without a doubt, impact the rest of my life in one way or another, whilst one of my key symptoms is cognitive disruption? Everyone puts it on you in this process: how bad do you really feel? Which approach? Which doctor? When do you want to do it? I’m fortunate to be highly functional given some of the cases I’ve read, and yet, it’s incredibly hard to trust my decision-making ability right now.

Surgery is two weeks from today.

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3 thoughts on “Decision Making with SCDS?

  1. pal2k9s

    Having just been through this, I can tell you that I had my doubts about surgery as well. I’ve got 4 and 5 year children here at home, and they are the reason why I had the surgery: I wanted to be a better person for them, a better mom. I couldn’t tolerate the sounds of their laughter due to the sensitivity of my hearing (among other things!). I haven’t been myself for 3 years with SCDS.

    A few days after surgery, still dizzy, I caught myself laughing out loud- really, really, loudly. It took me a few moments to realize that I wasn’t stifling my laughter due to the pain anymore. And it felt so good to just… feel good. That was the moment that I realized how long I hadn’t been happy. How long I hadn’t been “me”.

    Fear creates inertia for me, so I gave myself no choice but to move forward in my direction with surgery. With 2 young kids, I didn’t want to waste any more time. I spent my 10th day post op this evening with my kids, listening to their laughter and joining them in song. I hope that when/if you do decide to take the leap, keep focused on all that you will be gaining. 🙂 Hang in there!

    Reply
  2. pal2k9s

    Having just been through this, I can tell you that I had my doubts about surgery as well. I’ve got 4 and 5 year children here at home, and they are the reason why I had the surgery: I wanted to be a better person for them, a better mom. I couldn’t tolerate the sounds of their laughter due to the sensitivity of my hearing (among other things!). I haven’t been myself for 3 years with SCDS.

    A few days after surgery, still dizzy, I caught myself laughing out loud- really, really, loudly. It took me a few moments to realize that I wasn’t stifling my laughter due to the pain anymore. And it felt so good to just… feel good. That was the moment that I realized how long I hadn’t been happy. How long I hadn’t been “me”.

    Fear creates inertia for me, so I gave myself no choice but to move forward in my direction with surgery. With 2 young kids, I didn’t want to waste any more time. I spent my 10th day post op this evening with my kids, listening to their laughter and joining them in song. I hope that when/if you do decide to take the leap, keep focused on all that you will be gaining. 🙂 Hang in there!

    Reply
    1. Brad Post author

      I can’t tell you how much this comment meant to me. I’m sorry it’s taken me a while to reply back, but my wife and I read it over and again, and were so grateful. I don’t have the severe auditor symptoms, but the fatigue and dizziness kill me. I have a 6 and 3 year old, and can’t stand the idea that they can outrun me right now. Thank you so much, and please keep checking in.

      Reply

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